heythereuniverse:

Oxidation of III-V semiconductor through pin-hole | Dr. Pedro Barrios-Perez

heythereuniverse:

Oxidation of III-V semiconductor through pin-holeDr. Pedro Barrios-Perez

rosalarian:

theremina:

staceythinx:

Translucent Creature Photos from the National Geographic archives

Squeeeeeeeedlyspoochies! <3

Basically all of these things need to be mermified.

(via artist-refs)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Snowflakes aren’t the only frozen crystals to play with outside in the winter. Photographer Angela Kelly recently posted a series of frozen soap bubbles made by her and her son. In temperatures well below freezing, the thin film of the soap bubble does not survive long before it begins to freeze. The bubbles do not freeze all at once; instead the frost creeps gradually across it. For bubbles sitting on a surface, the ice front expands upward, much the same as with a freezing water drop. Once frozen, the bubbles crack or rip when touched instead of melting and popping. (Photo credit: A. Kelly; via BoredPanda; submitted by jshoer)

blamoscience:

These Pollia condensata berries are so colorful that they might have been picked minutes ago. In fact, they were gathered in 1974. Like beetles and butterflies, their color comes not from pigments but from the refractive geometries of their surface coverings, which don’t degrade over time. (Some beetle colors even shine true after nearly 50 million years.) Researchers say that P. condensata's blue is the most intense color in the natural world.
Image: Vignolini et al./PNAS

blamoscience:

These Pollia condensata berries are so colorful that they might have been picked minutes ago. In fact, they were gathered in 1974. Like beetles and butterflies, their color comes not from pigments but from the refractive geometries of their surface coverings, which don’t degrade over time. (Some beetle colors even shine true after nearly 50 million years.) Researchers say that P. condensata's blue is the most intense color in the natural world.

Image: Vignolini et al./PNAS

like-wildfire:

Neuronal Network by Zhong Hua
Captured by Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine grad student Zhong Hua, courtesy of Nikon’s Small World project, this image depicts fluorescent neurons in the peripheral nervous system of an embryonic mouse under a light microscope.

like-wildfire:

Neuronal Network by Zhong Hua

Captured by Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine grad student Zhong Hua, courtesy of Nikon’s Small World projectthis image depicts fluorescent neurons in the peripheral nervous system of an embryonic mouse under a light microscope.

(via cytofocus)

Amazing resonance experiment with salt

Using a vibrating metal plate connected to tone generator, Scientist Bruss Pup performs scientific magic by seemingly controlling and manipulating grains of salt to dance in specific patterns

(Source: gifcraft, via despicable-blog)

cupthong:

Human cheek cells, Elodea cells, and Onion cells

(Source: beyoncempire, via fuckyeahsciencegasm)

heythereuniverse:

Hippocampus | Tamily Weissman

"Brainbow" mice are engineered with a gene that includes three different fluorescent proteins, but only one color is actually expressed from each copy of the DNA construct. Pairs of "incompatible lox sites" are nested around different portions of the gene, allowing for recombination to snip out different parts of the gene randomly. Depending on what DNA is excised, a different color results.

heythereuniverse:

Skeletal preparation of a turtle | ZEISS Microscopy

jtotheizzoe:

myampgoesto11:

Microscopic images of plants by Fernan Federici

Oh, tiny garden. How pretty thou art.